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Best EVER Pizza Dough

Pizza Dough Recipe

This Pizza Dough will impress your fussiest dinner guests! Pizza is a quick, simple dish with endless possibilities.

Pizza has always been a huge hit in our house, mainly because of the versatility. This recipe was an experiment last summer when we had way too many tomatoes in the garden and I was desperately seeking ways to use them.

A basic pizza dough recipe requires water, eggs, flour & yeast. I substituted the water for crushed tomatoes and the recipe was born.

I use my own dehydrated jalapenos to add a little zest to the dough, but you don’t have to do this.

In the summer, I use fresh ingredients to make the flavors pop! 2 tomatoes will replace the 500ml jar of processed tomatoes, 1 diced jalapeno and as much or as little fresh, diced herbs as you like.

Pizza Dough
Best Ever Pizza Dough

The Best Way to Dress Your Best Ever Pizza Dough

Follow these simple steps to create your very own show-stopping pizza:

  1. Gently spread your sauce making sure to get right to the edge, but not on your crust.
  2. Liberally apply your cheese (I use a blend of cheeses) Your cheese should also go right to the edge.
  3. Have your toppings prepped and ready to go while your dough is rising.
  4. Chopped onions, peppers, mushrooms are all fairly standard pizza toppings, but you can get creative!

Pizza Variations

  • Meat lovers Pizza – diced ham, pepperoni, bacon
  • Rancher’s Choice – grilled chicken, bacon, onion, spinach. Use Ranch dressing in place of pizza sauce.
  • Cheesy Garlic Bread – Bake dough for 10 minutes, spread garlic butter & cheese, bake for additional 3 minutes or until cheese is melted.

Best Ever Pizza Dough

Not just a bland, ordinary pizza dough. This one is full of flavor, texture & can be adapted to suit your taste.

  • 1 500 ml jar of processed tomatoes (drained of extra fluid)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp Instant Rise Yeast
  • 2 tsp dehydrated jalapenos (optional)
  • 1 tbsp Italian Seasoning
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  1. Warm your oven by turning it on for about 5 minutes, then turn it off, keeping the door closed.

  2. In the food processor, add tomatoes & eggs, blend well.

  3. Add seasoning to the tomato, egg mixture

  4. In a large mixing bowl, combine tomato mixture, yeast & flour. Blend in all the flour to make a sticky dough

  5. Lightly dust the counter top with flour, turn out dough, scraping the bowl clean.

  6. Dust the dough with flour and begin kneading. Add more flour as you knead until the dough is no longer sticky and forms a ball.

  7. Oil a mental bowl and place dough ball smooth side down, then turn over to smooth side up.

  8. Cover with clean tea towel & place in warm over to rise (approximately 45 minutes)

  9. Prep your pizza toppings, including pizza sauce

  10. When dough has doubled in size, punch it down & turn onto lightly greased pizza pan.

  11. Using 2 hands, gentle shape dough to your pan, creating a crust around the edges.

  12. Place back in the warm oven for another 15 minutes to rest.

  13. Add sauce, cheese & toppings to your pizza

  14. Bake at 450 (F) for about 15 minutes or until cheese is melted & crust is lightly toasted.

This is not your average Pizza Dough.  This dough is light and packed with flavor!  

Yield:

1 – 16″ pizza (regular crust)

OR

2 – 12″ pizza’s (thin crust)

You can substitute any seasonings to create a Greek flavor or even an Asian flare. The possibilities are endless! 

Be sure to follow us on Facebook for more ideas on creative pizzas!

Have your tried this recipe? Leave us a comment below and tell us what you think!

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30 Surprising Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar

30 uses for Apple Cider Vinegar

Written by: Helen West, RD on August 30, 2016

30 Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar
Photography by Aya Brackett

Apple cider vinegar is a kitchen staple that has several impressive health benefits.

Interestingly, it also has a ton of different beauty, household and cooking uses.

Apple cider vinegar uses include cleaning, washing hair, preserving food and improving skin function.

It can also be used in all sorts of recipes, including salad dressings, soups, sauces, hot drinks and more.

Here are 30 ways to use apple cider vinegar.

1. To Lower Blood Sugar

ACV is claimed to help diabetics control their blood sugar levels.

Some studies have shown that consuming vinegar after a high-carb meal can improve insulin sensitivity by as much as 34% and reduce blood sugar levels significantly (1Trusted Source2Trusted Source3Trusted Source4Trusted Source5Trusted Source6Trusted Source7Trusted Source8Trusted Source9Trusted Source).

However, if you’re on medication for diabetes, you should check with your doctor before taking apple cider vinegar.

2. To Help You Feel Full

Apple cider vinegar is sometimes recommended as a weight loss aid.

This is because it may help you feel full.

Some short-term studies have shown that consuming apple cider vinegar may help you eat fewer calories, lose weight and reduce belly fat (10Trusted Source11Trusted Source).

However, its long-term effects on weight loss are unknown and likely to be small unless other dietary and lifestyle changes are also made (2Trusted Source).

3. To Preserve Food

Just like other types of vinegar, ACV is an effective preservative.

In fact, people have used vinegar as a pickling agent to preserve foods for thousands of years.

It works by making the food more acidic, which deactivates its enzymes and kills any bacteria in the food that may cause spoilage.

4. As a Deodorizer

Apple cider vinegar is known to have antibacterial properties.

Because of this, it’s often claimed that apple cider vinegar can eliminate bad smells.

There isn’t any research to back up these claims, but you can try it out by mixing apple cider vinegar with water to make a deodorizing spray.

This makes a natural alternative to odor neutralizers.

You can also mix it with water and Epsom salts to make a foot soak, like this. This may help get rid of unwanted foot odor by killing off odor-causing bacteria.

5. To Make a Salad Vinaigrette

One easy way to use apple cider vinegar is to make a simple salad dressing.

Homemade salad dressings can be much healthier for you than store-bought ones, and they’re often tastier too.

6. To Lower the Risk of Cancer

It’s often claimed that ACV can help lower your risk of cancer.

In test-tube studies, vinegar has been shown to kill cancer cells (12Trusted Source13Trusted Source14Trusted Source15Trusted Source).

Some observational studies, which can’t prove causation, have also linked consuming apple cider vinegar with a decreased risk of esophageal cancer. However, other studies have linked it with an increased risk of bladder cancer (16Trusted Source17Trusted Source).

Overall, there is insufficient evidence to make any claims regarding the effects of apple cider vinegar on the risk of cancer.

7. To Make an All-Purpose Cleaner

Apple cider vinegar is often a popular choice for a natural alternative to commercial cleaning agents. This is because of its antibacterial properties.

Mix 1 cup of water with half a cup of apple cider vinegar, and you’ll have a natural all-purpose cleaner.

However, it’s worth noting that although vinegars such as apple cider vinegar can kill some bacteria, they aren’t as effective at killing harmful bacteria as commercial cleaning agents (18Trusted Source).

8. To Soothe a Sore Throat

Apple cider vinegar is a popular home remedy for sore throats.

It’s thought that its antibacterial properties could help kill off the bacteria that could be causing the problem. However, there is no evidence to support its use in this way.

If you try this at home, make sure you mix the vinegar with water before gargling.

Or try this Fire Cider to boost your immunity to the common cold & flu.

This is because apple cider vinegar is very acidic and has been known to cause throat burns when consumed undiluted (19Trusted Source20Trusted Source).

9. As a Facial Toner

Anecdotally, apple cider vinegar is claimed to help remedy skin conditions and reduce the signs of aging.

As such, many people like to use apple cider vinegar to make a skin tonic.

The general recipe is 1 part apple cider vinegar to 2 parts water. This is then applied to the skin using a cotton pad. However, if you have sensitive skin, you may want to make a more diluted solution.

10. To Trap Fruit Flies

Fruit flies can be a pest.

Interestingly, it’s really easy to use apple cider vinegar to make a cheap fruit fly trap.

Simply pour some apple cider vinegar into a cup, add a few drops of dish soap (so that any trapped flies sink) and you’re good to go.

11. To Boil Better Eggs

Adding vinegar to the water you use to boil or poach eggs can help you produce consistently good eggs.

This is because the protein in egg whites firm up more quickly when exposed to a more acidic liquid (2122).

When you’re poaching eggs, you want the egg whites to firm up as quickly as possible so that the eggs keeps their shape.

Using vinegar when boiling eggs can also speed up the coagulation, or clotting, of the egg whites. This can be useful if the shell cracks while the egg is being boiled.

12. As a Marinade

Another way to use ACV when cooking is to make a marinade.

In fact, apple cider vinegar is a popular ingredient in many steak marinades, as it gives the meat a nice sweet and sour flavor.

Combine it with wine, garlic, soy sauce, onion and cayenne pepper to give your steak a delicious flavor.

13. To Wash Fruits and Vegetables

Pesticide residue on fruits and vegetables can be a concern for many people.

That’s why some people like to wash their fruits and vegetables in apple cider vinegar. The hope is that it’ll remove more of the chemical residues than water alone.

Although it’s not entirely clear if it will remove more pesticides than simply washing with water, it may help kill any dangerous bacteria on food.

For example, washing foods in vinegar has been shown to remove dangerous bacteria like E. coli and Salmonella (23Trusted Source24Trusted Source25Trusted Source).

14. To Clean Dentures

You can also use apple cider vinegar to clean dentures.

Although there’s no consensus on the best method to clean dentures, it’s thought that the residues left by apple cider vinegar could be less harmful to the skin in your mouth than other cleaning agents (26Trusted Source27Trusted Source).HEALTHLINE NEWSLETTERGet our twice weekly Women’s Wellness email

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15. In the Bath

For the same reasons people like using apple cider vinegar as a homemade facial toner, they also like using it in the bath.

If you want to try it, add 1–2 cups of apple cider vinegar to your bath water and enjoy a soak in your tub.

16. As a Hair Rinse

An apple cider vinegar hair rinse is said to remove product buildup, detangle and add shine to your hair.

Try mixing 1 part apple cider vinegar with 1 part water and pour the mixture over your hair. Leave it in for a few minutes before washing it out.

If you have sensitive skin, then you should try doing this with a weaker dilution first, as the vinegar is quite acidic.

17. As a Dandruff Treatment

Massaging diluted apple cider vinegar into your scalp may help get rid of dandruff.

It’s unclear how effective this is, but the theory is that the acid in the vinegar could help stop the growth of the fungus Malassezia, which may contribute to dandruff.

18. In a Sauce

Apple cider vinegar can be a great ingredient for a tangy sauce for your food. Try adding it to tomato-based sauces to give them a fuller flavor.

19. In Soup

Adding vinegar to soup can help bring its flavors to life.

If your favorite homemade soup tastes a little bland, try adding a little vinegar to it at the end. Add it gradually until the soup tastes great.

20. As a Weed Killer

Another great use for ACV is as a homemade weed killer.

Spray undiluted vinegar on unwanted weeds in your garden to get rid of them. You can also try mixing it with soap and lemon juice to see if that makes it more effective.

21. In Homemade Cakes and Candies

Apple cider vinegar is a popular flavor and texture enhancer in baking, especially when making vegan treats that can’t include eggs.

It can also add extra flavor to homemade candy and caramels, like in this recipe.

22. In a Hot Drink

Mix 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, 1 teaspoon of cinnamon, 1 tablespoon of honey and 2 tablespoons of lemon juice into 12 oz (355 ml) of hot water for an alternative hot drink.

23. As a Mouth Wash

Apple cider vinegar is often said to be a useful alternative to commercial mouthwashes.

Its antibacterial properties may help with bad breath, although there aren’t any studies examining how effective it is.

If you try this, make sure you dilute it well with water (the usual amount is 1 tablespoon for every cup, or 240 ml, of water), as the acidity of the vinegar could damage your teeth (28Trusted Source).

24. To Clean Your Tooth Brush

To have really clean teeth, it’s worth considering how clean your toothbrush is.

Given that apple cider vinegar has antibacterial properties, you can use it as a homemade cleaner for your toothbrush.

To make your own toothbrush cleaner, mix half a cup (120 ml) of water with 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of ACV and 2 teaspoons of baking soda and mix well. Leave the head of your toothbrush in the mix for 30 minutes.

Make sure you rinse your brush well before you use it, as the acidity of undiluted vinegar could damage your teeth.

25. To Whiten Teeth

Apple cider vinegar is acidic, so some people like to use it to remove stains and whiten their teeth.

To try this, rub a small amount of apple cider vinegar onto your teeth with a cotton swab. The results aren’t instant, but repeated use could remove stains over time.

However, be wary of this method for teeth whitening. Be sure to rinse out your mouth really well afterward, as the acid can damage the enamel on your teeth (29Trusted Source).

26. To Treat Acne

Dabbing small amounts of diluted apple cider vinegar onto pimples is claimed to be a good way to get rid of them.

However, undiluted apple cider vinegar is strongly acidic and putting it directly onto your skin can cause burns (30Trusted Source31).

27. To Get Rid of Warts

As with acne, ACV is claimed to be a natural agent for getting rid of warts. It’s likely effective for removing warts from skin due to its acidic nature.

However, be aware that this method is very painful, and some people who’ve tried it have required a local anesthetic (32Trusted Source33Trusted Source).

28. As a Natural Deodorant

Wiping your underarms with diluted apple cider vinegar is said to be a homemade alternative to commercially produced deodorants.

That said, although it’s popular in some circles, it’s not clear how effective it is.

29. As a Dish Detergent

Rinsing your dishes in apple cider vinegar could help kill off any unwanted bacteria and keep them clean.

Some people add it to their dishwater, while others even put it in their dishwasher.

30. To Get Rid of Fleas

ACV may help prevent your pet from getting fleas.

It’s thought that spraying a mixture of 1 part water and 1 part apple cider vinegar onto your pet will create an environment that fleas won’t want to hang around in.

31. Anything Else?

Apple cider vinegar is an extremely versatile household item that has a ton of different uses.

It can be a cheap and easy way to tackle many problems around your home.

How do you use your Apple Cider Vinegar? Share your tips in the comments below.

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How to Make Your Own Apple Cider Vinegar

How to Make Your Own Apple Cider Vinegar
How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar
How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar is a staple on this farm. We sprinkle that sh*& on everything, as they say. We use it for cooking, cleaning, animal care, immune support and skin care. Because we use so much of it, it is much more economical for me to make it and the home-made version has many more benefits than most of the store-bought options.

What Is So Special About Apple Cider Vinegar?

Apple cider vinegar (ACV) has many healthy uses. It is made through the process of fermentation and is high in phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, and calcium. Hippocrates is believed to have prescribed ACV for a variety of ailments. We make Fire Cider to support our immune systems during the winter.

ACV for Digestion and Heartburn

ACV is the base of spicy cider which is a great remedy to help quickly knock out a cold.

Amazingly, and contrary to what seems logical, ACV also has a valuable role in preventing heartburn and aiding digestion. In most cases heartburn is actually caused by too little stomach acid which slows down digestion. Food and gasses put pressure on the stomach, causing stomach contents (including stomach acid) to leak back into the esophagus. When you remedy heartburn with ACV it increases stomach acid and helps the body digest the food more quickly. This prevents the build-up and subsequent leakage which causes heartburn.

ACV Topically

In addition to its many benefits when taken internally, it is wonderful for the skin. When added to bathwater, it helps to naturally restore balance to the skin’s pH. It also helps kill bacteria and fungus on the skin which can lead to a host of problems, including eczema, dandruff, and other skin conditions.

Because of its great pH balancing benefits and dandruff preventing abilities, it makes a great hair rinse that replaces conditioner and can be used after shampooing with a natural shampoo.

Unfiltered, Unpasteurized, And With “The Mother”

Most of the ACV you find in the supermarket is pasteurized and highly filtered. These versions still work well for cleaning but they are not optimal for internal and culinary uses because most of the benefits are gone once the “mother” is filtered out and the vinegar is pasteurized.

There are a few available that are “with the mother” which means they leave in the beneficial bacteria that develops during the fermentation process in the vinegar. When you make your own ACV you can be sure that your vinegar retains this beneficial “mother.”

Important Notes:

  • This recipe uses sugar. The sugar is necessary to “feed” the yeast, but most (if not all) of the sugar is fermented out. People often ask if they can use honey. The short answer is yes, but it really does not work as well and causes the whole process to take longer. And to be honest, because the sugar is broken down, there really isn’t anything to be concerned about as far as the effect it will have on blood sugar.
  • Make sure all of your equipment and your jar are very clean. It is important to make sure you don’t introduce any bacteria other than what is naturally occurring in the process.
  • My favorite apple variety to use for applesauce is Red Delicious, only because I have a couple very old trees in my back yard. However, you get the best flavor if you have a mix of varieties. I use mostly Red Delicious, but I will throw in a mixture of other types for the rest. Some I have used are Fuji, Honeycrisp, Granny Smith, and McIntosh. It just adds some complexity to the flavor.
  • White scum is going to form on the top. This is normal. Mold, however, is not good and will spoil your ACV. Be sure that the apples stay submerged under the water. This will help prevent mold. You can use a fermentation weight or even just a smaller glass jar (thoroughly clean the outside) and set it on top of the apples to keep them submerged.
  • Gnats and flies love ACV so you need to make sure your jar is well covered. However, it needs to be able to breath and release gasses created from the fermentation process so do not use a solid lid. Cheesecloth or a coffee filter work well.

Final Notes

At some point while making apple cider vinegar, you will probably notice a SCOBY-like “thing” that forms on the top. This is the “mother.” You can remove it or you can just leave it floating in your vinegar.

If you don’t want to make your own apple cider vinegar, it is becoming more common for grocery stores to carry organic ACV “with the mother.”

How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar

Before starting to make ACV, there are a few things you’ll need to have on hand first:

Supplies:

  • Clean jar – you can use any size jar (I have used a wide mouth quart jar and a half gallon pickle jar)
  • Organic apple scraps – enough to fill your jar ¾ of the way full
  • Organic cane sugar
  • Filtered water
  • Fermentation weight or small glass jar
  • Cheesecloth or coffee filter
  • Rubberband
How to Make Apple Cider Vinegar
Making Apple Cider Vinegar with the “Mother”

Apple Cider Vinegar Recipe with the Mother

Apple cider vinegar with “the mother” has many benefits and it is simple to make at home with some organic apple scraps and a little time.

Ingredients

  • organic apple scraps
  • 2 TBSP cane sugar
  • 2 cups water (filtered)

Instructions

  • Clean a quart jar very well and let air dry.
  • Fill the jar ¾ full with apple scraps. If you are using whole apples, roughly chop them up before you put them in the jar.
  • Dissolve the cane sugar into the cup of water.
  • Pour sugar water over the apples until they are completely submerged. Add a little additional water if needed to make sure the apples are covered.
  • Weigh down the apples with a fermentation weight or with the small glass jar. Any apples that are exposed to the air could mold.
  • Cover with the cheesecloth or coffee filter and secure with the rubber band.
  • Store in a dark place at room temperature. I put mine in a cabinet in the kitchen.
  • Leave it for approximately 3 weeks. Check on it every few days to make sure the apples are staying under the water and to make sure no mold is growing.
  • After 3 weeks, it will still smell fairly sweet. Strain the apples pieces out and return the liquid to the jar. Compost the scraps.
  • Recover and put the jar back in a dark spot for another 3-4 weeks, stirring every few days.
  • When the ACV has reached the “tartness” you like you can put a lid on it or transfer it to a different jar with a lid and start using it!

Notes

This recipe is for a quart size jar of apple cider vinegar. If you are making a larger jar, just make sure your apple scraps fill the jar ¾ of the way and are covered with sugar water.When the ACV is finished you can save “the mother” that has floated to the top or just a small quantity of the finished ACV to start a new batch that will ferment more quickly. 

Nutrition

Serving: 2TBSP | Calories: 6kcal | Carbohydrates: 0.3g | Sodium: 1mg | Sugar: 0.1g

Have you made your own Apple Cider Vinegar? Tell us about it in the comments!

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How to Make Fire Cider – Natural Immune Booster

How to Make Immune Boosting Fire Cider

Written by: Andrea Scarborough, Naturally Knotty Farms

Fire Cider
Fire cider harnesses the beneficial properties of onion, garlic, ginger, and herbs, plus vinegar and raw honey for a nourishing drink with a little kick.

I first discovered a recipe for fire cider years ago. It didn’t sound like something I wanted to try immediately, but when I read about the immune-boosting benefits I decided to be brave and give it a try. Years later, it’s a staple at our house around cold and flu time.

Fire cider is a traditional recipe that contains garlic, onion, ginger, cayenne, vinegar, and raw honey. The original recipe calls for horseradish, but for the sake of the kids I typically substitute echinacea root.

Fire Cider

Fire cider harnesses the beneficial properties of onion, garlic, ginger, and herbs, plus vinegar and raw honey for a nourishing drink with a little kick.

How Does Fire Cider Taste?

Judging by the ingredients in the recipe, you might not expect it to taste very good. I didn’t either and I was quite pleasantly surprised by the taste. I’ve even tried it on salads as a dressing and it has a mild peppery and sweet vinaigrette flavor.

In the winter months, I sometimes take a teaspoon or so of this a day or use it on salads. If illness hits, I’ll take that dose every few hours or add a tablespoon to hot water or herbal tea a few times a day until I feel better.

For the kids, I reduce the cayenne or leave it out and they don’t mind the taste too much since the honey helps balance out the vinegar taste.

If you try fire cider and like it, I highly recommend Rosemary Gladstar’s Medicinal Herbs book as the reason I first discovered this remedy.

Fire Cider
Garlic, Onion, Jalapeno, Orange, Ginger, Apple Cider Vinegar

Spicy Fire Cider Recipe

An old herbal remedy that uses the germ-fighting properties of onion, garlic, ginger, and herbs. plus vinegar and raw honey for an immune boosting and nourishing drink with a little kick. 

Ingredients

  • 1 medium onion (peeled and roughly chopped)
  • 1 bulb garlic (peeled and roughly chopped)
  • 3 inch piece of fresh ginger (grated)
  • 1 TBSP dried echinacea root (optional)
  • 1 orange (sliced, optional)
  • 1 jalapeño (sliced, optional)
  • apple cider vinegar (organic, with “the mother”)
  • raw organic honey
  • 2 tsp cayenne pepper

Instructions

  • Place onion, garlic, ginger, and echinacea root, orange, and jalapeño if using in a quart size mason jar. Make sure garlic is at the bottom and completely submerged.
  • Add enough apple cider vinegar to cover the ingredients. Use a fermentation weight to make sure all ingredients are below the liquid level.
  • Cap tightly and leave in the jar for 2-3 weeks, preferably in a sunny or slightly warm place.
  • After 2-3 weeks, strain and discard the herbs.
  • After straining, measure the apple cider vinegar left and mix it with an equal amount of raw honey and add the cayenne pepper.
  • Store in the refrigerator and take 1 teaspoon as needed daily or when illness strikes. I’ve taken as much as 1 teaspoon an hour during illness until I felt better.

Notes

Don’t worry about the garlic turning green — it’s a normal reaction for garlic immersed in an acid. 

Do you make your own Natural Immune Support? Tell us about it in the comments.

  • Best EVER Pizza Dough
    This Pizza Dough will impress your fussiest dinner guests! Pizza is a quick, simple dish with endless possibilities. Pizza has always been a huge hit in our house, mainly because of the versatility. This recipe was an experiment last summer when we had way too many tomatoes in the garden and I was desperately seeking… Read more: Best EVER Pizza Dough
  • 30 Surprising Uses for Apple Cider Vinegar
    ACV is a kitchen staple on this farm with several impressive health benefits. Interestingly, it also has a ton of different beauty, household & cooking usses.
  • How to Make Your Own Apple Cider Vinegar
    Apple Cider Vinegar is a staple on this farm. We sprinkle that sh*& on everything, as they say. We use it for cooking, cleaning, animal care, immune support and skin care.
  • How to Make Fire Cider – Natural Immune Booster
    Fire cider harnesses the beneficial properties of onion, garlic, ginger, and herbs, plus vinegar and raw honey for a nourishing drink with a little kick.
  • 6 Reasons Why You Should be Making Bone Broth
    Bone broth has become very popular recently, especially among health-conscious individuals. This is because it’s believed to have many health benefits. Although there is no published research on bone broth itself, there’s plenty of evidence that suggests drinking it may be very beneficial. This article takes a closer look at bone broth, how to make… Read more: 6 Reasons Why You Should be Making Bone Broth
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6 Reasons Why You Should be Making Bone Broth

Bone Broth

Bone broth has become very popular recently, especially among health-conscious individuals. This is because it’s believed to have many health benefits.

Although there is no published research on bone broth itself, there’s plenty of evidence that suggests drinking it may be very beneficial.

This article takes a closer look at bone broth, how to make it and its potential benefits.

What Is Bone Broth?

Bone broth is made by simmering the bones and connective tissue of animals.

This highly nutritious stock is commonly used in soups, sauces and gravies. It has also recently gained popularity as a health drink.

Bone broth dates back to prehistoric times, when hunter-gatherers turned otherwise inedible animal parts like bones, hooves and knuckles into a broth they could drink.

You can make bone broth using bones from just about any animal — pork, beef, veal, turkey, lamb, bison, buffalo, venison, chicken or fish.

Marrow and connective tissues like feet, hooves, beaks, gizzards or fins can be used.

Health benefits of Bone Broth
Benefits of Bone Broth

1. It Contains Many Important Vitamins and Minerals

In general, bone broth is very nutritious.

However, the nutrient content does depend on the ingredients you use, as each brings something different to the table.

Animal bones are rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus and other trace minerals — the same minerals needed to build and strengthen your own bones.

Fish bones also contain iodine, which is essential for healthy thyroid function and metabolism.

Connective tissue gives you glucosamine and chondroitin, natural compounds found in cartilage that are known to support joint health.

Marrow provides vitamin A, vitamin K2, minerals like zinc, iron, boron, manganese and selenium, as well as omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids.

All of these animal parts also contain the protein collagen, which turns into gelatin when cooked and yields several important amino acids.

As the ingredients simmer, their nutrients are released into the water in a form your body can easily absorb.

Many people don’t get enough of these nutrients in their diet, so drinking bone broth is a good way to get more.

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to know the exact amount of each nutrient contained in the broth because every batch of bones is so different.

2. It May Benefit the Digestive System

Scientists have discovered that your overall health depends heavily on the health of your intestinal tract.

Not only is bone broth easy to digest, it may also aid in the digestion of other foods.

The gelatin found in bone broth naturally attracts and holds liquids. This is why properly prepared broth congeals in the fridge.

Gelatin can also bind to water in your digestive tract, which helps foods move through your gut more easily.

It has also been shown to protect and heal the mucosal lining of the digestive tract in rats. It is thought to have the same effect in humans, but more research needs to be done to show its effectiveness (1Trusted Source).

An amino acid in gelatin called glutamine helps maintain the function of the intestinal wall, and has been known to prevent and heal a condition known as “leaky gut” (2Trusted Source).

Leaky gut, which is associated with several chronic diseases, is when the barrier between your gut and the bloodstream is impaired.

Substances that your body doesn’t normally allow through leak into your bloodstream, which leads to inflammation and other problems.

For all of these reasons, drinking bone broth may be beneficial for individuals with leaky gut, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or irritable bowel disease (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease.

3. It May Help Fight Inflammation

The amino acids found in bone broth, including glycine and arginine, have strong anti-inflammatory effects (3Trusted Source).Arginine, in particular, may help fight the inflammation associated with obesity.

One study shows higher levels of arginine in the blood are associated with decreased inflammation in obese women (4Trusted Source).

Another study in rats suggests that supplementing with arginine could help fight inflammation in obese individuals, but more research needs to be done in humans to support these results (5Trusted Source).

While some inflammation is necessary, chronic inflammation may lead to a number of serious diseases.

These include heart disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis and many types of cancer.

Because of this, it’s important to eat plenty of anti-inflammatory foods.

4. Its Nutrients Have Been Shown to Improve Joint Health

Collagen is the main protein found in bones, tendons and ligaments.

During the cooking process, collagen from bones and connective tissue is broken down into another protein called gelatin.

Gelatin contains important amino acids that support joint health.

It contains proline and glycine, which your body uses to build its own connective tissue. This includes tendons, which connect muscles to bones, and ligaments, which connect bones to each other.

Bone broth also contains glucosamine and chondroitin, which are natural compounds found in cartilage.

Multiple studies have found that glucosamine and chondroitin can decrease joint pain and lessen the symptoms of osteoarthritis (6Trusted Source7Trusted Source8Trusted Source9Trusted Source).

The proteins in bone broth have also proven beneficial for those with rheumatoid arthritis, which is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes painful damage to the tendons and ligaments.

In one study, 60 people with rheumatoid arthritis consumed chicken collagen for three months. Symptoms improved significantly in all 60 participants, with four showing complete remission of the disease (10Trusted Source).

5. It Is Weight Loss Friendly

Bone broth is typically very low in calories, but can still satisfy hunger.

Studies have found that eating broth-based soup on a regular basis can increase fullness, reduce calorie intake and lead to weight loss over time (11Trusted Source12Trusted Source).

What’s more, bone broth contains gelatin, which has specifically been shown to promote feelings of fullness (13Trusted Source).

One study found that gelatin was more effective at reducing hunger than the protein casein, which is found in dairy products (14Trusted Source).

Another study in 53 men found that, when combined with resistance training, collagen helped increase muscle mass and decrease body fat (15Trusted Source).

6. It May Improve Sleep and Brain Function

The amino acid glycine, found in bone broth, may help you relax. Multiple studies have found that glycine helps promote sleep (1617Trusted Source18Trusted Source).

One study found that taking 3 grams of glycine before bed significantly improved the quality of sleep in individuals who have difficulty sleeping (16).

Taking glycine before bed helped participants fall asleep faster, maintain a deeper sleep and wake up fewer times throughout the night. This study also found that glycine reduced daytime sleepiness and improved mental function and memory.

Therefore, drinking bone broth could have similar benefits.

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How to Make the Perfect Bone Broth

Bone Broth

Wholesome and deeply nourishing, bone broths are among the most affordable and nutritious foods you can make at home. Rich in protein with a deeply savory aroma and flavor, broth gives foundation to soups, stews and sauces. Even more, you can also sip them on their own as a restorative.

Nutrient Rich Bone Broth
Nutrient Rich Bone Broth

What is bone broth?

Bone broth is the liquid that is leftover after you simmer meaty bones and connective tissue in water for an extended period of time. In addition to bones, connective tissue and joints, bone broths often contain vegetables, herbs and spices as well as wine or apple cider vinegar.

Vegetables, herbs and spices give flavor bone broths, but sometimes cooks add medicinal herbs like reishi or ashwaganda to give broth unique therapeutic properties.

An acidic ingredient, like wine or apple cider vinegar, helps break down the protein in connective tissue and collagen to produce a gelatinous, protein-rich broth. And it’s that protein that you’re after when you drink broth.

While you can use it as a base for soups, stews sauces and gravies, it’s traditionally sipped on its own as a restorative food. That is, people traditionally sipped broths with the intention of mitigating an illness, like a cold, or to restore and maintain general health.

What’s the difference between broth, stock and bone broth?

  • Broth is typically made from meat and simmered a short while. Broths are light in flavor, and often sipped on their own as a restorative tonic.
  • Stock is made from meaty joints and bones, simmered a moderate amount of time and cooks use them as the foundation of other foods like sauces, soups and stews.
  • Bone broth is made from a variety meaty joints and bones, simmered for an extensive period of time, and typically sipped one its own as a restorative tonic.

Nutrition

Many people sip bone broth or begin making it at home, because they’ve heard that it may support digestion, fortify the immune system, or help reverse visible signs of aging. And while bone broth is an excellent source of collagen and a nutritious foods, its specific benefits are less clear.

  • Bone broth is rich in a protein called gelatin, made from dissolved collagen. Collagen is found in connective tissue. While the amount of protein will vary depending on volume of water used, types of bones and length of cooking, most bone broth contains about 10 grams of protein per 8-oz serving.
  • It’s also rich in the amino acids like glycine and proline. Glycine is an important neurotransmitter that has anti-inflammatory properties and supports the immune system . Proline, along with other key nutrients like vitamin C, helps to support healthy joint health and collagen production.
  • Bone broth contains B vitamins like niacin and riboflavin, both of which play a role in metabolism. They also help your body break down carbohydrates, proteins and fats to produce energy.
  • Bone broth is rich in glucosamine and chondroitin, two nutrients that help support joint health.
  • Bone broth contains trace amounts of minerals, but, despite popular claims, it is not a good source of calcium, phosphorus or other minerals.

Which bones should you use for your broth?

Good bone broth gets its characteristic gelatinous structure from collagen. And collagen comes from the connective tissue in meat, ligaments, and on bones. So, for a good-flavored broth that’s also rich in protein and gelatin, select a wide variety of bones that include some joints as well as meaty bones.

  • For beef bone broth and beef stock, use knuckle and neck bones, shanks and oxtails. You can also use marrow bones, too. But, be careful, as too much marrow makes for poor flavor, greasy texture and no gel.
  • For chicken bone broth, use a whole chicken, chicken feet, the frame of a roasted chicken, or chicken backs and wing tips. You can even make it using only chicken feet.
  • For turkey bone broth, use the frame of a roasted turkey, turkey backs, wing tips and feet, if you can find them.
  • For pork, use ham hocks and pork neck bones. If you’re lucky enough to find them, you can also use pork trotters, too.

Tips for making bone broth

Making bone broth is fairly straightforward and easy. And if you can turn on your oven, or boil a kettle of water, you can make good bone broth. Of course, there’s a few key tips you’ll want to pay attention to so that your broth comes out perfect every time.

How to get started

  • Roast your bones first. Roasting bones caramelizes their proteins and releases some fat. And that means a richer and more robust flavor for you.
  • Use wine for a touch of acidity. An acidic ingredient like wine helps to balance the flavors in bone broth, and gives better flavor than apple cider vinegar.
  • Use enough water to just cover the bones, but not too much more. Bone broths achieve their gel and high protein content because they tend to use less water than the amount used for meat broths and traditional stocks.
  • Spoon off any foam or scum that rises to the top, while it’s mostly made of protein and is fine to eat, it can make your broth cloudy and muddy the flavor.

How to get a good gel

  • Bring your kettle to a boil, and then immediately turn down the heat to a slow simmer. Simmering broth at a low temperature means better clarity, better flavor and a less greasy broth. The right temperature is also key in making sure your broth gels.
  • Simmer bone broth for several hours, not days. Simmering your broth for too long may make the gelatin break down, and it can release histamines to which some people experience sensitivity. You’ll still get plenty of protein and loads of flavor with a shorter simmer. And you won’t waste energy in the process.

How to develop great flavor

  • Add medicinal and culinary spices at the beginning. Black pepper and tough, woody herbs like dried bay, and dried roots like astragalus need time to release their flavor so add them to the pot with your bones.
  • Add roasted garlic and onions at the beginning. You can toss onion halves and garlic in with your bones when you roast them, and they’ll give your broth fantastic flavor.
  • Add vegetables at the end. Vegetables like carrots and celery can give broth a lovely flavor. But, they can also make your broth taste overly sweet, tinny or like overcooked vegetables. And no one wants that! Add them in the last 20 to 30 minutes of cooking for the best flavor.
  • Add leafy herbs at the end. Leafy herbs like parsley, savory and basil can give it a beautiful punch of flavor. Unfortunately, they’ll lose all their vibrance if added to early. So add them in the last 10 minutes of cooking, or right when you take the pot off the heat.

Finishing your broth

  • Strain the hot broth into glass containers, and allow at least 1 inch of head space (or 2 if you plan to freeze the broth).
  • Degrease your broth by letting it sit and spooning off any fat that floats to the surface. Or transfer it to the fridge, and the fat will rise to the surface and coagulate as it cools. Lift off the fat with a spoon or fork before you eat it to avoid a greasy, unpalatable broth.

How to use all that broth

Traditionally, people sip bone broths on their own or with herbs and a sprinkle of sea salt for flavor. In this way, they’re primarily served as a restorative. However, you can use them just as you would traditional stocks and meat broths, too.

  • Sip bone broth on its own, or with a sprinkle of salt and a swirl of spices and herbs. It’s an excellent protein-rich snack or appetizer.
  • Use it to make soups and stews, like Mushroom StewTurkey and Wild Rice Soup, or Potato Leek Soup.
  • Use it to make sauces like gravy, pan sauce or reduction sauces.
  • Cook rice or grains in bone broth for a boost of flavor and protein. It’s fantastic in mushroom risotto.

Basic Bone Broth Recipe

Prep Time 5 mins Cook Time 8 hrs Total Time 8 hrs 5 mins Servings: 8 servings (2 quarts)  

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds bones (chicken, beef, pork, lamb etc.)
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 12 cups water
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • finely ground real salt

Equipment

  • Heavy Stock Pot, Crock Pot, Instapot or oven

Instructions

  • Heat the oven to 400 F, and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Arrange the bones on the baking sheet, and drizzle with extra virgin olive oil. Next, roast them for 30 minutes, or until slightly brown. Turn half-way through to promote even cooking.
  • Using a pair of kitchen tongs, transfer the bones to a heavy stock pot. And then pour in the wine and water. Drop in the bay leaves and peppercorns.
  • Bring the pot to a boil over medium-high heat, and then immediately turn the heat down to low. Simmer, uncovered, at least 8 hours and up to 16 hours. Skim any foam that appears at the surface of the broth.
  • Strain the broth, and season it with fine sea salt as you like it. Serve immediately, or pour it into jars and store in the fridge up to 1 week and in the freezer up to 6 months.

Notes

On Your Timing: Chicken bones and other small bones take less time, and large bones like beef bones require a longer simmer.

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Simple Recipe to Make Jalapeno Jelly

Jalapeno Jelly

Jalapeno Jelly is a great way to WOW your guest this Holiday Season! This is not nearly as spicy as you’d expect it to be.

Yield – 10 – 12 125ml jars

Ingredients:

Jalapeno Jelly
12 Medium Jalapenos
  • 12 medium Jalapeno Peppers (I added a couple chili peppers for a little extra ZING)
  • 2 cups Apple Cider Vinegar (divided)
  • 6 cups of sugar
  • 2 pouches of Liquid Pectin

Directions:

  1. Wearing gloves, slice each pepper in half – removing the cap, stems & spines.
Jalapeno Jelly
Sliced & cleaned
  1. Dice up peppers and puree with 1 cup of apple cider vinegar.
Jalapeno Jelly
I used a Magic Bullet & it fit perfectly.
  1. Add your puréed peppers to a large heavy-bottom pot along with remaining 1 cup of apple cider vinegar.
Jalapeno Jelly
Add 1 more cup of apple cider vinegar
  1. Stir in 6 cups of sugar and boil hard for 10 minutes.
Jalapeno Jelly
Adding Sugar
  1. Sterilize your jars
Jalapeno Jelly
Sterilizing jars
  1. Add pectin to your boiling pot and boil for 1 minute.
Jalapeno Jelly
Liquid Pectin (no affiliate)
  1. Pour into jars, cap and process in a hot water bath.
Jalapeno Jelly
Jalapeno Jelly!

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