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Calendula – Why & How to Grow it!

calendula

Learn how & why you should grow Calendula in your garden. We offer FREE Calendula Seeds, so you can grow your own and reap the benefits!

Why Grow Calendula

Bright yellow and orange flowers, historically used for medicinal and culinary purposes, come from easy calendula care when growing this simple flower. Commonly called the pot marigold (Calendula officinalis), the calendula flower has long been a staple in British cottage gardens.

Petals are used in cooking, and were used as yellow coloring in cheeses and butters in centuries past. When used in stews, broths and salads, these petals add a spicy taste similar to saffron to many dishes. All parts of calendula plants are useful in many ways. The plant is said to stimulate the immune system and is currently used as an ingredient in many cosmetics.

Flowers and leaves of the calendula may be dried and stored for later use. In the vegetable garden, calendula draws aphids away from valuable plants. While uses of calendula plants are diverse, growing calendula in the flower or herb garden is an optimum use of this attractive plant.

Calendula plants are frost tolerant and somewhat cold hardy and add long-lasting color and beauty in a flower bed or container.

Planting Calendula

Calendula is easy to grow from seeds directly sown in the garden or containers. Plant seeds in early spring and repot or transplant sturdy seedlings after the threat of frost. Calendula will tolerate poor conditions but grows best when it has rich soil. Once established, it doesn’t need much water or fertilizer to grow. Calendula is a full sun plant, however, it’s not a fan of sweltering hot temperatures and might start wilting in intense heat.

Calendula has no serious insect or disease problems. They can sometimes be susceptible to powdery mildew (remedied by good air circulation), and slugs and snails may feed on them, especially young plants. Keep ground areas clear of debris to minimize slug and snail damage. Aphids and whiteflies can sometimes be a problem; spraying with water or treating with insecticidal soaps can control these pests.

Light

Calendula generally prefers full sun, but it sometimes languishes during the hottest months unless it receives some afternoon shade in hotter areas.

Soil

Like most members of the daisy family, calendula needs a well-drained soil high in organic material. Dense, wet soils can cause the roots to rot. This plant tolerates a wide range of soil pH but prefers a slightly acidic to neutral soil.

Water

Water frequently until the plants are established. Mature plants thrive on only occasional watering. Avoid too much water with these plants.

Temperature and Humidity

Calendula prefers mild summer temperatures and may die away by the end of summer in very hot climates.

Fertilizer

Calendula does not need much in the way of feeding. If planted in fertile garden soil, it requires no additional feeding at all. Marginal soils may require feeding with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer, but over-feeding can make the plants leggy and spindly. Container plants require monthly feeding with a diluted, balanced fertilizer.

How to Care for Your Calendula

If deadheaded regularly, this plant can bloom from spring through fall and beyond. In warmer areas, the calendula may take a break from blooming during summer heat and then put on a show as temperatures fall in autumn. Regular pinching keeps the 1-3 foot (30-90 cm.) plant bushy and prevents tall, spindly stalks.

Now that you’ve learned how to grow calendulas, take advantage of their long-lasting blooms in the herb garden or light shade area. Experiment with use of calendula flower petals to replace saffron in recipes. If you are so inclined, use plant parts as a topical treatment for minor scrapes and cuts.

How is it prepared?

Calendula can be found in many different preparations. It is the flower heads that are used to prepare the calendula medicine. 

Calendula extract can be prepared as a tincture to be taken internally or as an ointment to be used externally. Calendula ointment, calendula oil or calendula cream can be used to promote wound healing on the skin, especially shallow wounds by applying it around the area. 

Furthermore, calendula plants can be prepared as a tea which is one of its more traditional uses. Calendula tea is a gentle way to incorporate the healing properties of the flower into your daily schedule. This way it helps to soothe all of the tissues of the digestive tract while also calming the body down. 

Benefits for inflammation in the body

Soothing and Healing

Possibly the most important and well-known properties of the Calendula herb is its anti-inflammatory action. These anti-inflammatory properties allow calendula oil to topically soothe inflamed skin and rashes of any kind. It both works to soothe and calm down the reaction on the skin as well as heal the skin so that this reaction does not continue to happen in the future.

In addition, these actions make this an incredible tool for healing tissues internally as well. Calendula has an affinity for the digestive tract. It helps to stimulate the digestive function decreasing stagnation and allowing food to move through our bodies. It also helps to support any of the digestive tissue along the way that is inflamed or compromised in any way. It can heal the tissue and tighten it up making it more resilient to stressors. At the same time, it can help to decrease pain by calming the tissues themselves. This can help it to relax the muscles and can be especially helpful in digestive cramping or period cramping. 

Overall this herb is one that works to soothe the entire body from an internal and external place.

Cautions

Caution should be taken when using calendula over deep wounds as it is so efficient at healing that it could theoretically heal the outer layers of skin before the inner layers. Those with an allergy to the Asteraceae family including daisies and daisy-like plants should avoid using calendula in any capacity as it could elicit an allergic reaction. 

Calendula Tea

To make a tea that soothes internal mucous membranes, add calendula flowers to water in a ratio of a tablespoon of fresh or two teaspoons of dried flowers to a cup of water. Bring to a boil and simmer or allow to steep for 10 minutes.

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Keep Growing – How to Identify & Care for your Seeds

Keep Growing

Welcome to our Keep Growing Project! If you haven’t already requested your seeds, you can do so here.

We grow many things on this Farm from beautiful flowers, medicinal plants & herbs to delicious fruits & veggies. Most of these plants produce seeds to ensure their circle of life. We collect the seeds that Mother Nature gives us and pass them on to you!

Our Moto here on the Farm is – Healthy Soil, Healthy Food, Healthy Minds. Growth is essential to life, without it, eventually we wither up and blow away. We want to encourage your growth – mind, body & spirit. We also think there needs to be a little adventure, a lot of faith and a dash of curiosity. This is why we send you seeds unlabeled. We want to spark your curiosity and sense of adventure and never lose your faith.

All the seeds we have shipped out originated on this farm. We grew them all, harvested them, dried them & stored them for you.

Identify your Seeds

Calendula

Bright yellow and orange flowers, historically used for medicinal and culinary purposes, come from easy calendula care when growing this simple flower.

Petals are used in cooking, and were used as yellow coloring in cheeses and butters in centuries past. When used in stews, broths and salads, these petals add a spicy taste similar to saffron to many dishes.

The calendula flower or flowering herb is an annual which will readily reseed. Too much calendula care can result in stunted or slow growth. Poor to average, well draining soil and only occasional watering after plants are established is the secret to growing prolific calendula plants.

Chinese Balsam

Chinese Balsam / Impatient

Chinese Balsam or Garden Balsam, is grown for both its showy multicolored flowers as well as its medicinal use in both Indian and Victorian gardens alike. Known for the explosive nature of its seed pods which is where the genus impatiens got its name.

Self-seeding annual.  70 days to flowers.  Plant prefers full sun, rich soil, frequent watering.  Sow directly in spring garden or grow in pots.  Barely cover seed, tamp securely, and keep evenly moist, warm and in the light until germination, which takes 3-6 days.  Easy germination, quick bright flowers and magical seed ejection makes this a child’s favourite.  Space plants 6” apart or let them fall where they may.

Birdhouse Gourd

Birdhouse Gourds

Birdhouse gourds make an ideal gardening project for the whole family. The hard-shelled hanging fruits are not edible but are wonderful for craft projects such as creating decorative homes for the birds. 

The vine and leaves are incredible soft & fuzzy to the touch and grows quickly.

Start seeds indoors 6 weeks before last frost. Transplant to garden bed in a sunny location. Support mature plants with a trellis.

Leave the gourds on the vine until after frost, when the vine has died completely. Allow your gourds to dry indoors. Give them a good scrubbing with a water/vinegar mixture to kill the mildew that may grow as it hardens. Once you can hear the seeds rattling inside, cut your hole for the birds, empty the gourd & decorate as you please. Hang outside for the birds to enjoy.

Cantaloupe

Cantaloupe is 90% water and loaded with electrolytes!! Be sure to have some on those dog days of summer to stay hydrated!!

Plant cantaloupes in full sun in well-drained soil. Cantaloupe plants need about 85 days to mature, but don’t rush planting. Sow seeds only when temperatures reliably stay above 10 – 15 degrees C. Plant in groups of two or three seeds spaced 2 feet apart.

We hope you enjoy your FREE Gift from us! Everyday, nature shows us how she grows, adapts & evolves to the world around her. You can do the same!!!

Please share your seed journey with us, either on Facebook or in the comments below!

Keep Growing!!

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3 Simple Herbal Tea Infusions

Herbal Tea

I’m going to preface this post with full transparency. I am not an herbalist. However; I have been enjoying the benefits of herbal tea for years!! We use teas for just about everything. I have chosen some simple recipes with very common ingredients that most people have at home. If not, they are at all local grocery stores.

Herbal Tea

Chronic Pain Tea

Most of your regular garden herbs are highly medicinal so it makes sense to have them close at hand. Basil, thyme & oregano all have pain & inflammation-reducing properties and they make a wonderful, highly drinkable tea!!

2 cups water

1/2 cup roughly chopped fresh Basil, Thyme & Oregano

  1. Add chopped herbs to a 473 ml jar
  2. Bring water to a boil
  3. Pour boiled water over herbs
  4. Steep for 10 – 15 minutes
  5. Strain out the herbs
  6. Add honey if you wish

Drink daily, as often as needed, to help relieve chronic pain & inflammation. It may take several weeks of daily use for pain to subside.

Non-habit-forming pain reliever!!!

**Pregnant women should avoid using large amounts of basil.

All three of these herbs are also great for the immune system, so drink this when you feel a sickness coming on to help you get better quickly.

Herbal Tea

Thyme, Peppermint, Honey Tea for Coughs

“Tis the season to be snotty…”

Thyme & Peppermint are especially good for treating persistent coughs, with Thyme being a potent natural expectorant & Peppermint acting as a decongestant. A few spoonfuls of honey to help sooth the throat, and lemon juice is an antibacterial and adds a boost of flavor & Vitamin C.

2 cups water

1 tbsp fresh Thyme

1 tbsp fresh or dried Peppermint

2-4 tbsp Raw Honey

1 lemon wedge

  1. Bring the water to a boil & pour over herbs.
  2. Let steep for 10 – 15 minutes
  3. strain out herbs, and stir in honey.
  4. Drink 1 – 2 cups, as needed to relieve a persistent cough.

** Nursing Moms should avoid Peppermint as it can reduce the supply. Spearmint is a good alternative with similar benefits.

*** While Thyme & Peppermint are highly effective for treating coughs, sage, oregano, and rosemary are also beneficial and can be substituted if that’s what is growing in your herb garden.

Herbal Tea

Children’s Calming Herbal Tea

It is common knowledge that children can easily become overstimulated and, for lack of a better word, rambunctious. When it comes time to bring your child back to center, this calming tea can really help. Catnip, in particular is an amazing herbal ally for children, as it has a gentle calming effect that promotes relaxation and sleep. Lemon balm and chamomile are flavourful herbs that are safe for children and also have a calming effect. all three of these herbs have the added benefit of being good for children’s digestion. In the summer time, pour this tea into popsicle molds for a fun, healthy, relaxing treat. Small amounts of this tea can be given to babies over the age of 6 months.

  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tbsp dried chamomile flowers
  • 1 tbsp dried lemon balm
  • 1 tbsp dried catnip
  • 1-2 tbsp raw honey (optional) (NOT to be given to children under 1 year)

Instructions:

Bring water to a boil and pour over herbs. Steep for 10 – 15 minutes, then strain out the herbs. Add honey, if using.

Serve hot or iced.

Dosage

  • 6 months – 1 year: 1 – 2 teaspoons daily
  • 1 – 2 year: 2 – 4 teaspoons daily
  • 3 – 7 years: 2 – 4 tbsp daily
  • 8 – 12 years: 1/4 – 1/2 cup daily
  • 13+: 1 – 2 cups daily

Have you tried these Herbal Tea recipes? Tell us what you think in the comments below, or share any other tried & true home remedies you use!

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How to Save our Ontario Farmland

Save Ontario Farm Land

Between 1996-2016, Ontario saw equivalent of 5 family farms paved under each week.

Over the past two decades, Ontario lost farmland at a rate of 175 acres (about 70 hectares) a day, the equivalent of five family farms each week, according to a recent analysis of census data from the Ontario Federation of Agriculture (OFA). 

That loss has largely been on the urban rim of Ontario’s cities, where outer suburbs meet with some of the country’s best-quality soil, which is being replaced by houses on large lots, new roads, highways and strip malls at a daily magnitude roughly equivalent to 135 football fields between 1996 and 2016, the OFA said. 

The analysis is part of a new advocacy campaign launched this month by the farm group, which seeks to give the preservation of Ontario farmland used for food production new urgency.

Among the most recent threats to farm country, according to the OFA, are Minister’s Zoning Orders, or MZOs, a powerful mechanism used by the province to override local councils to fast-track development that, until the election of the Progressive Conservative government under Doug Ford, was rarely used in the province. 

Save Ontario Farm Land

Use of MZOs raises ‘significant issues’ for farmers

“There’s significant issues with MZOs and the lack of long-term planning,” said OFA president Peggy Brekveld, a northern Ontario dairy farmer. 

She pointed to a number of recent examples where Municipal Affairs and Housing Minister Steve Clark used his extraordinary power to override local planning processes, including fast tracking a housing development in Caledon, a Chinese-owned glass factory in Stratford, as well as a number of other developments in the Greater Toronto Area

While Brekveld criticized the government, she fell short of answering whether farmers, who are among the Ontario PC government’s biggest supporters, may also be its biggest victims when it comes to MZOs. 

“It’s a great question, but I’m not going to go there. Instead, I’m going to say everybody benefits if we look at long-term land use planning.” 

However, the province told CBC News that it only uses MZOs when a local community asks for it. 

“MZOs issued by our government on non-provincially owned lands have been at the request of local municipalities,” Krystle Caputo, director of communications for Municipal Affairs and Housing Minister Steve Clark, wrote in an email. 

“The previous Liberal government carved up the Greenbelt 17 times, so it is no surprise they were losing 175 acres of farmland per day,” she said. 

London, Ont., home to some of best land in Canada

The problem of urban expansion is of particular concern in the fast-growing London region, where large swathes of some of the best farmland in Canada  have been paved over in the last half-century for shopping malls and suburban housing developments. 

“Look at how much London has grown,” said Crispin Colvin, a Thorndale area farmer and an executive member of the OFA board of directors. “Masonville being the cattle farm that it once was in the ’70s and ’80s and to the PetSmart and Loblaws. It’s a big problem.”

Colvin said beyond London, many of the small towns and villages that fall into the city’s orbit are also growing quickly, as more people push outwards trying to find cheaper land outside the city — turning places such as Ilderton or Lucan, Ont., into bedroom communities. 

“All of that is class one, two and three land, which is the best land in the country, let alone Ontario, and we only have about one per cent of all land in Ontario that fits into those classes of one, two and three.”  

Under the Canada Land Inventory or CLI, land is graded for its potential agricultural use from one to seven, one being the highest potential for use in mechanized agriculture with high to moderate nutrients and seven being the least, including marshland, rock and steep slopes. 

“The more we lose class one, two and three farmland, the less opportunity we have to grow locally,” Colvin said, noting that Waterloo Region is among the only urban areas in Ontario that shows a preference for building up rather than out. 

Save Ontario Farm Land

Urban growth threatens rural sustainability

The OFA argues the current practice of destroying farmland in favour of urban development at a rate of 175 acres daily is unsustainable because if it continues, it could one day affect the country’s food sovereignty, whereby a people have control of their own food and nutrition from growth to consumption. 

“We lose sight of the fact that food is the most important aspect of development that we should be looking at. We should be protecting our food source.

“If we continue down this path, ultimately Ontario and Canada could be a net importer of food rather than a net exporter of food and that could change our whole economic structure as well, not just our concern with food security.”

Colvin said one only has to look as far as the COVID-19 pandemic to understand what happens to nations who do not control the supply of vital commodities such as food, which he likens to vaccines in the current health crisis. 

“Countries that had vaccine ability were keeping it for their populations and their people. Imagine what would happen if we end up doing the same thing with food?” 


Author Credit:

Colin Butler

Video Journalist

Colin Butler is a veteran CBC reporter who’s worked in Moncton, Saint John, Fredericton, Toronto, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton and London, Ont. Email: colin.butler@cbc.ca

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How To Build an Indoor Worm Farm

Indoor Worm Farm

Worms play an important part in soil construction and recycling of organic waste. They are a part of a network of organisms that turn refuse into nutrient rich soil. These nutrients are one of the benefits of garden worms to plant growth. Worms in gardens also perform cultivation functions that increase soil porosity and allow oxygen to get into roots. Encourage earthworms in soil or even try worm composting to experience the life-giving effects of worm castings.

Worms tunnel in soil and eat organic matter, which they excrete as castings. Worms abound in soils that are around 21 C. Any extremes of cold, heat or moisture are not good for worm activity. Worms in gardens are most active when soil is moderately warm and moist. Their tunneling behavior accentuates the percolation of water into the soil. They also loosen soil so oxygen and aerobic bacteria can get into plant roots. Looser soils also allow plant roots to penetrate deeper and access more resources, which in turn builds bigger, healthier plants. One of the biggest benefits of garden worms is their ability to turn garbage into fertilizer.

Indoor Worm Farm

A worm composting bin, known as a vermicomposter, can be fairly inexpensive and easy to maintain. There are several ways to vermicompost. Below are instructions on how to build one kind of worm composting bin designed to be used inside. It is also possible to purchase worm composting bins. You will want to put your bin in an indoor space as you do not want the worms to freeze in the winter or get too warm in the summer. Additionally, you may want to put the bin in a basement or other out-of-the-way space since you will be producing compost and worm “tea” in the composter.

What You Need

First, buy, borrow or repurpose the following items that you will need to start worm composting:

1. Two plastic bins – one must be taller and rest inside the other, shorter bin.

  • The shorter, bottom bin does not need a top. A bin made of rubber or plastic and that is approximately 15 inches deep, 25 inches wide and 5 inches high works great. The extra length allows you to scoop out the extra liquid or “worm tea” for use elsewhere (e.g., in the garden, for plants, shrubs, etc.).
  • The top tub should have a top to keep the worms from finding their way outside the box. It also needs to be somewhat flexible so you can drill holes into it. An 18 gallon tub that is roughly 15 inches deep, 20 inches wide and 15 inches tall works well.

2. A drill – A drill with a one inch diameter and a one-eighth inch diameter drill bit is needed to drill the holes mentioned above.

3. Screening material – The type used for window screens is fine – just be sure NOT to use metal which will rust over time when exposed to the moisture in the bin. You only need about four 4 inch by 4 inch scraps of screen. Why use screening? If you don’t cover the holes, the worms may escape.

 Waterproof glue – To keep the screens in place, even after they get wet.

5. Shredded paper – Enough to fill your bin three inches deep and extra to add each time you feed the worms once a week. Almost any kind of paper works, but avoid heavy, shiny paper and colored paper.

6. A little bit of dirt – A pound will be enough. Just make sure it does not have harmful chemicals in it. If all goes well, the worms will be producing their own dirt (compost) soon.

7. A little bit of water – Some water is needed to moisten the paper and dirt to create a comfortable medium for the worms to thrive. Soak the paper and then drain it before using.

8. Worms – A pound of red wrigglers are recommended because they consume waste quickly, but earthworms also work. Red wrigglers are available online, or from another worm bin owner. Be careful of worms that are invasive species, such as the Asian Jumping Worm, which can be sold as the Alabama Jumper or Georgia Jumper. Worm bins produce more worms as well as great compost.

9. A trowel – Needed to move the compost as needed in the bin.

10. Food scraps container – Use a small container with a tightly fitting top to collect vegetable and fruit scraps.

Why not just put the food straight into the worm bin? Worms do best left alone, so it is best to feed them only once a week. Use the food scraps container to collect scraps for a week and then feed the worms weekly.

Preparing the Bins

Below are the steps to take to prepare the bins:

  • Drill a 1-inch hole about two inches from the top of the taller bin on one side. Drill another hole on the opposite side. Drill four 1/8-inch holes near the bottom near the corners of the bin.
  • Cover each of the holes with vinyl screening and glue the screening in place with the waterproof glue. Be sure the glue is completely dry before continuing to the next step.
  • Place the tall bin inside the short bin. Do NOT drill any holes in the short bin.

Preparing the Paper, Soil, Water Medium and Adding the Worms

Combine shredded paper, soil and just enough water to dampen everything. Put the mixture into the tall bin and fill the bin about three inches deep. Add your worms to the mixture and let them get used to it for a day before feeding them. Make sure the mixture is very moist, but not forming puddles of water.

Feeding the Worms

Collect food scraps, such as vegetables and fruit scraps, bread, tea bags, coffee grounds, and cereal in your food scrap container as you prepare and clean up after meals. Do not include any animal by-products (fat, bone, dairy, meat, waste). Also, it may take the worms longer to process woody or dry items like stems or the outer layer of onions. Worms will eat paper as long as it is thin or cut into small pieces, but they will not eat plastic or fabric tea bags, coffee filters or the labels placed on produce by grocery stores.

Once a week, do the following:

  • Take the scraps to the worm bin.
  • Gently use a trowel to create a hole to put the scraps into.
  • Throw in a small handful of shredded paper.
  • Add all the food scraps on top of the paper.
  • Cover ALL of the food scraps with dirt and moist paper. Exposed food attracts fruit flies, but covered food scraps don’t. Add dirt and moist paper to the bin until the worms have made enough compost to use to cover the food scraps.
  • Notice what the worms are eating and what they are not. Remove any scraps that your worms have not eaten for a while as they may not like that type of food (e.g., some worms will not tackle a whole potato or citrus rind, but may eat them if they are cut up).
  • Put the lid back on the worm bin.
  • Wash out the food scraps container for the coming week.

Maintaining the Bin

Once every few months, scoop the liquid out of the lower container and use it as fertilizer outside on soil near plants, or water it down to use on indoor plants. When the worm bin is full (i.e., when the compost reaches the bottom of the top holes you drilled), do the following:

  • Feed the worms on one side of the bin for a couple of weeks in order to draw the worms to that side.
  • Once all the worms are on one side, harvest the compost on the other side and use it in pots, your garden, or sprinkle it across your yard. You can also scoop compost and worms onto a newspaper and sort them out, but this is a bit messier. Be sure to harvest compost at the end of the week, before you feed the worms again.
  • If there are too many worms in the worm bin, share extras with friends and family or release some with the dirt in your yard.

If you have any questions, please contact us.

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How to Get Your Kids Gardening

Gardening
Edible Gardening with Kids

Growing Food with Kids

Getting kids to enthusiastically eat their greens isn’t always a walk in the park, (let’s face it, it’s hard to make broccoli seem exciting next to a chicken nugget). Luckily, we’ve figured out a great way to pique your children’s interest in fresh vegetables: getting them set up with their very own food garden.

Kids are curious mini-scientists by nature, and they’re sure to get a kick out of the process of creating a garden and watching it develop day by day. Anything that can get kids outdoors, eating healthy, and eager to learn without the use of Wi-Fi or a tablet is good in my books.  

Edible Gardening with Kids Activities

Children’s Gardening Activities

Start by helping your child pick out some tools and equipment for their gardening project. A sense of ownership and a little creative control can really motivate kids and encourage them to work independently. When it’s their own special project, they’re inspired to make it the best it can be. Purchasing some trowels, gardening gloves, and decorative planters in their favourite colours is a great way to kick off their first, and hopefully not last, edible gardening endeavour.

If your child is an artsy type, set up some paints and craft supplies so they can decorate their planters. Stick a couple of googly eyes onto a terracotta pot, give it a snappy name, plant some seeds, and watch as Captain Majestic grows a lush head of leafy green hair as he sunbathes on the windowsill.

When you’ve decided on which vegetables your kids would like to try planning, get them to write out and decorate some plant labels, and attach them onto toothpicks to stick into each pot to keep things organized.   

Edible Gardening with Kids Seed Starting

Edible Gardening Ideas for Kids

Planting seeds in small cups and letting them sprout on the windowsill until they’re ready to make their way into the yard is a good way to get started earlier in the season with your edible gardening, while also increasing your chances of a successful yield. Each morning at breakfast, your family can check up on their little plants and track their growth. By the time they’re ready to get transplanted into the garden or a bigger pot in the yard, the kids will be brimming with anticipation.

When you plant your seeds, make sure you put two or three in each cup. This way, as they start to sprout, you can pick out the weaker ones and cultivate the strongest one. This can be particularly helpful if you have multiple kids who tend to get competitive, because if one child’s bean plant isn’t growing quite as well as the others, they might get a bit crabby.

When it’s time to transplant your seedlings, choose a designated area of the yard to be their own personal gardening zone. Help them set up their decorated planters on a sunny corner of the patio or assist them in digging up some holes in the garden to place their plants in. Remind them to be gentle when placing their plants into their new home, because if the roots get jostled too much it could cause some damage.  

Edible Gardening with Kids Vegetables

Fruits & Vegetables: Basics and Beginner Projects   

Some veggies are a little more low-maintenance and easier to cultivate than others. Here’s a list of viable options for a kid-friendly garden that will produce a sizeable amount of fresh food for your family to enjoy:

Green Beans: These really are the perfect starter vegetable for younger kids, since they grow quite fast. Plus, they don’t take up too much space, so you can grow them in containers or the garden – whatever floats your boat.

Peas: Really any type of pea will work (sweet pea, sugar snap). Peas grow quickly, and who can resist fresh picked peas! You may need to stake your plants, or allow them to grow in a hanging basket.

Tomatoes: Smaller varieties of tomatoes are also pretty quick to develop and the amount of food they produce is pretty impressive. Plus, they can be used in a lot of kid-approved meals, like pizza, spaghetti and nachos. If you end up with more tomatoes than you can manage to eat in time, encourage your child to bag some up and give them to friends and family. Trust me, if they’re anything like mine, they’ll love boasting about how they grew their own food.

Cucumbers: They aren’t too tricky to cultivate, and their mild flavour is a winner among fussy eaters who don’t like the bitterness of some raw veggies. Crack open a tub of dip and enjoy!

Radishes: Another fast grower, but with a zesty flavour that’s got just the right amount of spice for a kid to handle, radishes are a particular favourite among the younger crowd. Something about pulling out a radish from the soil to reveal a bright red clown nose evokes excitement in the most wholesome way.

Strawberries: Nothing beats fresh strawberries on a bowl of ice cream on a hot summer day! Your plants may not produce fruit the first year, but it is definitely worth the wait!

With our world creeping closer and closer to being run by technology and spending time indoors, getting our children interested and engaged with the world outdoors is as important as ever. It’s a great way to make sure they explore, develop, ask questions, and learn with us as we share something so important.

Post Credit

Naturally Knotty Farms